Flight of Ideas

Well….typical ADHD day for me….brain flits from this to that and then finds a shiny thing to watch for a few seconds.

I was diagnosed with Adult ADHD about four months ago…which caused my mother to say…”Well, THAT explains everything!”.

Wow.

Here’s today’s flighty recap:

“Mom, mom…..Mommy!!!!! Mom, mom…..mom…do you hear me? MOM!!!!!”

Son #1 managed to get through another day of 7th grade without a girlfriend (thank god!) and kick ass in a baseball game.

Daughter #2 managed to get through another day of 5th grade with Maximum attitude…resulting in a few disciplanary actions…..

Son # 2…see Colin Speaks

Hubby? Well, I don’t want to know that he’s in 90 degree weather (and I don’t care how much time he spent inside)….

Daughter #1 I imagine is doing okay since she hasn’t asked for anything lately or wandered into more trouble than she can handle.

Life as a relatively single Mom with crazy schedules and Asperger’s needs gets tough sometimes.
But…it’s good…it’s ALL good…or at least it wil be when it all pays off.

And tomorrow, I cap off or begin (however you want to look at it) my 40 lb weight loss with the beginning of a crazy, insane home workout….

I’ll let you know if I’m alive on Sunday, K?

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Post-It Note Tuesday

It’s almost Wednesday and I’ve missed a few of these but….

and if you ever want to create your own or find more of these to read…

When Red isn’t Really Red

I would like a word with the Crayola Company. Frankly, any maker of crayons, markers or colored pencils. I’d like to invite them to my home to observe the frustration Colin experiences when he’s required to do a coloring activity. Why? Because not one crayon in the box is labelled “Red”, “Blue”, “Green”, “Yellow”, “Brown”…you get the idea.

Colin doesn’t like to color for fun. His preferred style is to scribble with a Black crayon. However, when homework requires him to “Color the square shapes red”, for example, he’s more than willing. It’s required, therefore it’s a rule and he must follow it. (One benefit of his typical AS personality.) Because his fine motor skills are diminished it takes a LONG time to get the coloring to stay within the lines…but he’s meticulous in that task. What would take a neuro-typical child three minutes to complete takes Colin ten. IF he can find the right colored crayon to fit the job.

This is where my gripe with those crayon companies comes in.

Colin’s literal brain can’t use “Posh Pink”, “Rusty Brown”, “Blue Green” or “Amber Yellow” when his instructions call for pink, brown, green or yellow crayons. Even “Light Blue” won’t work if the required color is simply BLUE. We’re working through it … like we’re working through everything, but it’s not easy. He feels like he’s not doing his homework right.

I do love all the beautiful colors in a great big box of crayons…it’s just not Aspie friendly and I’ll be darned if I can find a normal box (other than with the kids meals at Applebee’s) of crayons without the extra hues thrown in.

Yesterday, I took Colin and his best friend (Yeah! he has one!) to the petting zoo and then for ice cream. Colin ordered his typical “Green” ice cream (read mint-choco-chip) and I got strawberry. He looked at my dish and uncharacteristically ventured outside his zone and asked if he could taste my flavor. He liked it! Cool…

HIM: “Mom, next time we come here I will ask the persons with the ice cream for a medium cup of strawberry…and then the time after that…which will be two times from now…which is the third time…I’m going to try the raspberry ice cream in a medium bowl.”

Well, okay I thought.

Later that evening he repeated this agenda to Liam at the kitchen counter while they ate dinner.

Colin: “Liam, I had green ice cream today…next time I go to the petting zoo I am going to have strawberry…I tried it and I think I like it…then the third time I go I will sample raspberry.”

Liam: “Cool buddy. It’s good to try new things. You want to try raspberry huh?”

Colin: “Yes, Raspberry is darker than Red. I don’t know what color Raspberry really is, but if I taste it, maybe I can find out and then I’ll know.”

There ya go, Crayola…just flavor the off-the-wall hues in the box and we’ll be fine!

Going Gluten Free (And broke!)

Today I wandered into the world of gluten-free shopping. Since Colin’s diagnosis of Asperger’s last Fall, I (information sponge of a Mom) have spent countless hours reading books, articles and scouring websites for information on therapies, remedies and diets. Over and over I’d smack into websites discussing a Gluten and Casein free diet for kids on the spectrucm.

The theory is that AS kids may not properly digest gluten and casein which form peptides that can actually turn into an opiate like substance in their bodies to which they then become addicted. Peptides may change behaviors, perceptions and responses to stimuli. If this is true, the child may then limit his entire diet to gluten and casein products because it’s what makes him feel good (like an alcoholic with a drink) even though it’s actually making him feel bad.

Andy and I had tossed the idea of trying to slowly go gluten/casein free (GFCF) but we couldn’t agree on when. Until this week…when our pediatrician took a look at Colin and ordered a barrage of bloodwork to rule out iron deficiency and Celiac Disease. UGH!!!

Until I have the full results of the bloodwork, I’m starting slow beginning with gluten replacements and toning down how much milk he drinks…but here’s the kicker…

Over the past year, Colin has completely self-limited his eating to carbs and dairy…hmm? Is there truth to the theory that he might be an addict? I’m beginning to think so. His gut is a mess (but I won’t elaborate), he’s exhausted all the time, his “belly hurts”, his behaviors are (off meds) out of control at times.

If it turns out he has Celiac disease…I guess I’ll go cold turkey on the gluten, but I’m not a cold turkey kinda girl…

So, I’d like to hear from any of you who’ve made this leap. Tell me how your child did…was withdrawal as bad as I’m imagining? And how in the hell do you explain to a six-year-old that he can’t have Kraft Mac’n’Cheese anymore (when it’s truly a food group in his world).

I started today to stock the pantry. Luckily we have some decent grocery stores but I felt like a total stranger in the land! I bought mixes and fixes. Two and a half hours and $200 later, Erin prounounced the Gluten Free Blueberry Waffles acceptable…we’ll have to see what Colin says (if it ain’t EGGO, it ain’t a waffle).

I might need some serious handholding soon.